FAQ’s

FAQ’s : Weave

Weave Related Terms begin with ‘A’

American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC)
Founded in 1921, the AATCC is the world’s leading not-for-profit professional association for the textile design, materials, processing and testing industries. AATCC has thousands of individual and corporate members in more than 60 countries. The Association is internationally recognized for its standard methods of testing dyed and chemically treated fibers and fabrics to measure and evaluate such performance characteristics as colorfastness to light and washing, smoothness appearance, soil release, shrinkage, water resistance, and the many other conditions to which textiles may be subjected.

CATEGORY : Fiber, Weave

SOURCE : www.aatcc.org

American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)
A nonprofit organization that provides a voluntary consensus system for developing standards through committees composed of producers, engineers, academics, regulatory bodies and other stakeholders.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : www.astm.org

American Textile Manufacturers Institute (ATMI)
The U.S. textile industry’s trade association for the domestic textile industry; activities encompass government relations, international trade, product and administrative services, communications and economic information.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : ACT Glossary

applique
An ancient needlework technique in which pieces of fabric, embroidery or other materials are sewn onto a foundation fabric to create designs.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.

argyle
A pattern consisting of diamond shapes of different colors knit in a fabric.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

armure
A plain, striped, ribbed or woven fabric having small fancy designs that suggest chain armor.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : answers.com

Association for Contract Textiles (ACT)
The Association for Contract Textiles is a nonprofit organization that was founded in 1985. ACT is a professional trade group consisting primarily of companies that design, develop, produce and promote textiles for commercial interiors united for support, strength, credibility and common interests.

CATEGORY : Fiber, Green, Weave

SOURCE : ACT
bar (or barré)
A line of off-shade color running selvage to selvage in a fabric, caused by a change in loom tension or irregular dyeing.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

barathea
A closely woven dobby-weave fabric with a characteristic pebbly surface. Generally made from silk or rayon, and often combined with cotton or worsted. Fabric is usually used for dresses, neckties and lightweight suits.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
bark crepe
A crepe fabric textured to simulate the appearance of tree bark.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : answers.com
basket weave
A plain weave with two or more warp and filling threads interlaced to resemble a plaited basket.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
batik
An Indonesian word that refers to a generic wax-resistant dyeing technique used on textiles.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
batiste
A fabric named for Jean Baptiste, a French linen weaver. Lightweight, sheer, delicate fabric in a plain weave with a delicate hand and a graceful drape.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Silk Road, inc.
beaker dyeing
The dyeing of small fabric samples during color development.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
beam
The cylinder at both the front and back of a loom, onto which the warp is wound.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
bengaline
A fabric having a crosswise ribbed effect made of silk, wool or synthetic fibers.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
bias
An invisible line at 45 degrees diagonal to the grain of a fabric.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
bird’s eye
A dobby-loom weave characterized by a small diamond shaped spots resembling bird’s eyes.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
blanket
A textile sample showing a series of patterns or colors all on the same warp.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
bombazine
A fine English twilled fabric of silk and worsted or cotton.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
bouclé
A fabric woven with boucle yarns, which have a looped appearance on the surface.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
reaking strength
The measurement of stress exerted to pull a fabric apart under tension.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : ACT Glossary
brocade
A rich jacquard fabric with allover interwoven design of raised figures or flowers. The name is derived from the French word meaning “to ornament.” The brocade pattern is emphasized with contrasting surfaces or colors and often has gold or silver threads running through it.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
burlap
A coarse, heavy plain-weave fabric made of jute.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
burn-out
A technique used to develop raised designs on fabric surface. Primarily done in fabrics with at least two different fiber content, i.e. cotton-polyester, silk-rayon, etc. One fiber component is being dissolved through chemical reactions while the other content remains intact, resulting in the illusion of a raised design.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : answers.com
canvas
Usually cotton or linen woven in a heavy firm weave.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
carding
A process used for all natural fibers, in which they are separated and brought into general alignment before spinning. Yarns spun from carded wool are called woolen yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
challis
A fine, light weight, plain-weave fabric; one of the softest fabrics made.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
chambray
A popular cotton fabric in plain weave that combines colored warp and white filling yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
check
A small pattern of squares.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
chevron
/ The general shape of a V character similar to zigzag stripes.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
chiffon
A lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric woven with twist yarns. The twist in the crepe yarns puckers the fabric slightly in both directions after weaving, giving it some stretch and a slightly rough feel. Made of silk, wool, or man-made fibers; From the French word for cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
chintz
1. A highly lustrous printed cotton fabric with often with a glazed finish. 2. A painted or stained calico from India.

CATEGORY : Finish, Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
cisele
A velvet fabric on which the pattern is formed by contrast between cut and uncut pile loops.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
clipped fabrics
Clipping or shearing of floating threads between the design during finishing.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
cloqué
A cotton, silk or rayon fabric with a raised woven pattern and a puckered or quilted look.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
colorfastness to light
A material’s degree of resistance to the fading effect of light.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : ACT Glossary
converter
An individual or company that buys grey goods, applies any numbers of finishes (dyeing, printing, mercerizing etc.) and sells the finished fabric to a wholesaler or retailer.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
corduroy
A durable cut-pile fabric, usually made of cotton with vertical ribs. Back may be plain or twill weave.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
count
1. The number size of a yarn. The higher the count, the finer the yarn. 2. The number of ends and picks per inch of weave. The higher the count, the finer the weave.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
crepe
A light, soft, thin fabric of silk, cotton, wool or another fiber with a crinkled surface. The crinkled surface is produced by hard twist yarns, chemical treatment, weave, or embossing.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
cretonne
A heavy, unglazed cotton, linen or rayon fabric, colorfully printed and used for draperies. Similar to unglazed chintz.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
rinoline
Open, stiff weave with a hard-twist cotton warp or horse hair filling.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
crocking
The rubbing off of color due to improper or insufficient dye penetration or fixation. Crocking can occur under wet or dry conditions.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
cut-pile fabric
A cloth with a three-dimensional surface produced by double weaving or by looping an additional warp or filling thread into the basic weave, and then cutting the loops (i.e. velvet, velour, plush).

CATEGORY : Fiber, Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
damask
Jacquard woven, firm textured fabric with a raised pattern similar to a brocade but flatter.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
denim
A washable, strong, twilled cotton cloth with the warp yarns dyed blue and undyed filling yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
density
The number of picks and ends in a cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
dimity
A lightweight, sheer cotton fabric having at least two warp threads thrown into relief to form fine cords.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
direct print
A pattern and/or ground color printed on the fabric in the desired colors.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
disperse dye
Sparingly soluble in water, particles of dye disperse in water and slowly dissolve into the fibers. Disperse dyes can be applied to a wide variety of fibers, but are really the only practical means of coloring acetate and polyester fibers.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Understanding Textiles (7th ed.) by Billie J. Collier, Martin J. Bide & Phyllis G. Tortora
dobby
Term applied to the loom or fabric. A dobby control on a loom controls the harnesses to permit the weaving of small geometric patterns. A dobby fabric, is made on a dobby loom and has a small geometric design.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
double-weave
A type of advanced weave achieved by interlacing two or more sets of warps with two or more sets of filling yarns. Face and back may contrast in weave and color.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
duvetyn
A very high-quality cloth resembling a compact velvet. It has a velvety hand resulting from the short nap that covers its surface, completely concealing its twill weave.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
embroidery
Designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle to decorate fabric or other materials.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
end and end
A weave with two colors alternating in warp yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
épinglé
A type of velvet fabric woven on a wire loom or épinglé loom. The épinglé velvet is specific by the fact that both loop pile and cut pile can be integrated into the same fabric.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
eyelash
A fabric spotted with fringe oblongs resembling eyelashes.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
fabric widths
Upholstery fabrics are generally manufactured in widths 48″=120 cm, 60″=150 cm. Normal upholstery yardage requirements are based on 50″-54″ goods.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
face
The side of the fabric which is visible when upholstered on furniture.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
faille
A soft, slightly glossy fabric in a rib weave, with a light, flat, crosswise rib or cord made by using heavier yarns in the filling and not the warp.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
felt
A fabric of matted, compressed animal fibers, such as wool or fur, sometimes mixed with vegetable or synthetic fibers.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
fiber reactive dye
Used to dye cellulose fibers. Reacting chemically with the molecules of the fibers, resulting in unusually fast, brilliant colors. Also referred to as “reactive dyes”.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
fill
Crosswise yarns in the weave, synonymous with weft.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
flammability
The measurement of a fabric’s performance when it is exposed to specific sources of ignition.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : ACT Glossary
flannel
A soft plain or twill woven fabric of wool or a blend of wool and cotton or synthetics.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
float
Portion of warp or weft that covers two or more adjacent warp or weft threads to form a design.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
foulard
A lightweight twill or plain-woven fabric of silk or silk and cotton, usually having a small printed design.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
fringe
An ornamental border consisting of short lengths of hanging threads or tassels, often attached to a separate band.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
frisé
French for curl. Applied to different weaves made of looped, knotted or curled yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
gabardine
A sturdy, tightly woven fabric of cotton, wool or rayon twill.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
galloon
A narrow band or braid used as trimming and commonly made of lace, metallic thread or embroidery.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
georgette
A sheer, strong silk or silk like clothing fabric with a dull, creped surface.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
gingham
Plain weave cotton fabric. Usually yarn dyed and woven to create stripes, checks or plaids.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
glazed
Cotton fabrics such as chintz or tartan treated to give them a polished look.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
grain
An invisible vertical line parallel to the selvage of a fabric. The pattern visible on the outer surface of a hide after the hair has been removed.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
grenadine
A fine, loosely woven fabric in a leno weave.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
grey goods
Woven fabric as it comes from the loom; undyed, unbleached, unprinted and unfinished. Also called greige goods.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
grinning
The condition in which the ground cloth of a pile fabric becomes visible when it is folded or creased.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
grosgrain
A closely woven silk or rayon fabric with narrow horizontal ribs.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
grospoint
A non-directional uncut pile fabric that is warp-looped and extremely resilient and hard wearing. Made of wool or man-made fibers, it generally has larger loops than a frisé.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
habutai
Smooth, soft, light, plain weave silk originally hand woven in Japan.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
hand
Touch, drape or “handle” of a fabric.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
harness
A rectangular frame on a loom that holds the heddles through which the warp yarns pass. A loom’s harnesses raise and lower the heddles in predetermined patterns so that the filling yarns can be threaded through the warp sheds to produce the desired weave. Different weaves may employ anywhere from one to forty harnesses.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
heddles
The needle-like wires on a loom through which the warp yarns are drawn and which raise and lower those threads during weaving. See harness.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
herringbone
A fabric in which the pattern of the weave resembles the skeletal structure of the herring. Made with a broken twill weave that produces a balanced zigzag effect.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
honeycomb
Weave with the surface resembling the cells of a honeycomb.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
hopsacking
An open basket weave that gets its name from the plain-weave fabric of jute or hemp used for sacking in which hops are gathered.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
houndstooth
A broken twill four-pointed star check.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
iridescence
Changeable color effect usually obtained by contrasting colors in warp and filling yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
Jacquard
A woven-in pattern made by special looms which control individual weaving threads in warp to produce complicated patterns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
jaspe
Upholstery, drapery or suiting fabric which has a series of faint stripes formed by light, medium and dark threads of the same color.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
nitting
The process of making fabric by interlocking a series of loops of one or more yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
lace
A delicate fabric made of yarn or thread in an open web like pattern without the aid of a ground fabric.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
lamé
Brocade with metal pattern or ground. Also, plain metal fabric and fabric embroidered with metal.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
lampas
A multi-warped weave with ornamental designs.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
lawn
A sheer, plain cotton weave made of fine combed yarns, often in a high thread count.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
leno
A structure in which pairs of warp yarns are twisted around each other between filling yarns, giving open-weave fabrics firmness and durability.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
loft
The bulk or resilience of a fabric, yarn or fiber.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
loom
A weaving machine that produces textiles by interlacing warp and filling yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
Martindale Test
A wear abrasion test used extensively in Europe. The fabric’s warp and weft are abraded at the same time.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
matelassé
An intricately woven fabric created with two sets of warp and filler threads in a double weave giving an embossed, puckered or quilted effect. From the French word meaning “to quilt” or “to pad”.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
mesh
Any fabric woven or knitted with an open texture, fine or coarse.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
moleskin
A heavy sateen-weave, often napped or sheared to give a suede effect.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
monk’s cloth
A heavy, loosely woven basketweave in solid colors, with stripes or plaids.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
mossy crepe
Various crepes constructed to have a mossy look.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
motif
The feature or subject of a composition or work.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
mourning crepe
A dull, semi-sheer crepe which often has a moire effect.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
mousseline
A fine, sheer fabric resembling muslin.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
muslin
Plain-weave sturdy cotton fabrics.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
nacre velvet
Velvet with back of one color and pile of another, resulting in a changeable, pearly appearance.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
nap
The cut-pile or fuzzy surface finish of a cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
needle point
Simple stitch embroidery completely covering mesh or canvas grounds.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
ninon
A sheer fabric of silk, rayon or nylon made in a variety of tight, smooth weaves or open, lacy patterns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
non-woven
A material made of fibers in a web or mat held together by a bonding agent that is not woven, knitted or spun.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)
Implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) began on January 1, 1994. This agreement removes most barriers to trade and investment among the United States, Canada and Mexico.

CATEGORY : Fiber, Weave

SOURCE : USDA Foreign Agricultural Service
nubbed fabric
A fabric decorated with novelty yarn containing slubs, knots, beads or lumps.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
ondule
Wavy effect in a fabric achieved by weaving.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
organdy
Sheer, plain cotton weave made of fine combed yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
organza
French for transparent, crisp silk organdy.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
ottoman
Heavy corded silk or synthetic fabric with larger and rounder ribs than a faille. Fillings are usually cotton or wool, and should be completely covered by the silk or man-made fiber warp.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
overplaid
Double plaid in which weave or color effect is arranged in blocks of the same or different sizes, one over the other.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
oxford cloth
A soft, somewhat porous cotton shirting fabric with a silk like luster finish. Made in a basketweave construction, and available in colors or solids. The cloth tends to soil easily because of the soft bulky filling yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
paillette
From the French for sequin. Generally larger than sequins.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
paisley
A paisley or paisley pattern is a droplet-shaped vegetal motif of Persian origin similar to half of the Yin yang symbol, or the leaf of the Indian bodhi tree or the mango tree; or to a leech. The western name derives from the town of Paisley, in central Scotland.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
panama
Plain woven hopsacking of coarse-yarn basket weave, plain or in two colors, producing a texture similar to that of panama hats.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
peau de soie
A medium to heavy drapeable fabric with a satin weave and delustered finish; a traditional fabric for wedding dresses.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : denverfabrics.com
pebble
An irregular or rough surface with a pebbly look, as in a pebble crepe.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
photographic prints
Made from photoengraved rollers that transfer photographs to cloth. Several processes, all adapted from color printing on paper.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
pick
One thread of warp or filling.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
piece dyeing
A common method of dyeing that allows flexibility to meet color demands, i.e. a material dyed in the piece after weaving.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
pile fabric
Fabric with cut or uncut loops which stand up densely on the surface. Not to be confused with napped fabrics, which have brushed surfaces. Velvets, plushes, velveteens and corduroy are cut pile fabrics. Epingles are uncut pile fabrics.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
pile weave
A three-dimensional surface construction in which cut or uncut loops protrude from the ground cloth. The loops may be made of warp or filling yarns, and be produced by a double wave or with wires. The wire method uses round-tipped wires to raise loops for uncut pile, and sharp-edged cut wires for cut pile.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
pilling
The formation of little fuzzy balls on a fabric surface caused by the rubbing off of a fiber’s loose ends that are too long or strong to break away.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
pincheck
A very tiny check.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
pique
Refers to a weaving style, as in “pique cotton”, which is characterized by raised parallel cords or fine ribbing (for example, in the collar of a polo shirt or tennis shirt). Twilled cotton (see Twill) or corded cotton are close relatives.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
plaid
A pattern of colored stripes or bars crossing each other at right angles.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
plain weave
The most simple method of interlacing warp and weft threads to make a cloth. Each filling thread passes alternately under and over the warp yarns to produce a balanced construction. Also known as ‘tabby,’ this is a strong weave, inexpensive to produce, and the best ground for printing. However, if the thread count is low, the fabric may be too weak for upholstery.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
Plisse
Usually a print cloth treated with chemicals that cause part of the cloth to shrink, creating a permanently crinkled surface.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
plush
Warp pile fabric originally made from silk or wool that is distinct from velvet because of its longer and less dense pile. Modern plushes can be made of polyester.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
polypropylene
The basic fiber forming substance for olefin.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
pongee
A plain woven, light weight or medium-weight fabric made from wild silk. Almost always pale or dark tan, but now sometimes printed, bleached and dyed in colors.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
poodle cloth
Loopy boucle or knotted yarn cloth that looks like the coat of a poodle.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
poult de soie
A silk fabric in plain weave with heavy filling strands forming cross ribs, sometimes called a Faille Taffeta.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
printing
The process of producing designs of one or more colors on a fabric using different methods, such as roller, block, screen, and several color techniques, such as direct, discharge, and resist.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
qiviut
Underwool of the domesticated musk ox that is considered the rarest and most luxurious wool fiber in the world. Fleece is not shorn from the musk ox, but it is shed naturally and removed from the guard hairs as it becomes visible.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
rabbit hair
Hair from the common rabbit or hare. Occasionally blended in various weaves and knits for softness or special effects.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
radium
A smooth, soft-luster plain-weave silk or rayon fabric similar to habutai.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
railroading
Applying fabric to furniture so that the weft runs vertically, avoiding intermediate seam detailing.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
ramie
A tall, tropical Asian perennial herb, Boehmeria nivea, cultivated for its fibrous stems. Ramie is the fiber extracted from this plant, resembling flax. Used chiefly for table linen.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
raveling
The fraying of yarn at the cut edge of a cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
reactive dyes
Used to dye cellulose fibers. Reacting chemically with the molecules of the fibers, resulting in unusually fast, brilliant colors. Also referred to as “fiber reactive dyes”.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
reed
The comblike device on a loom through which the warp ends pass.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
resilience
The property of a textile material to recover from a deformed state.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
resist dyeing
A pattern and ground created by methods used to “resist” or prevent the dye from reaching all the cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
resist prints
Made by printing the designs using substance that resists dye stuffs. The fabric is often piece dyed to obtain the wanted color.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
reverse twill weave
A patterned twill weave using both right and left hand twills.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
rib
Usually a straight cord formed by a heavy thread, length wise, crosswise or diagonal.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
ribbon
A narrow woven fabric with woven selvage for trimming or decoration.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
sateen
A cotton cloth made in a satin weave, often treated with high luster and crease-resistant finishes.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
satin weave
Basic weave, characterized by floats running in the warp direction in such a manner that gives the fabric a gloss, luster or shine.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph
Schiffi
A machine for embroidering and making heavy venise lace.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
Scottish plaid
A coarse, very durable twilled woolen fabric made of Scottish native wool.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
screen prints
Similar to stencil work, except that a screen is used. Certain areas of the screen are treated to take dye, others to resist dye. A paste is forced through the screen onto the fabric by a squeegee to form the pattern.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
seam slippage
The movement of yarns in a fabric that occurs when it is pulled apart at a seam.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
seconds
Imperfect fabrics with weave, finish or dyeing flaws.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
seersucker
A thin, all-cotton fabric, commonly striped.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
selvage
Heavy reinforced outside woven edges of cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
sequin
A small, sparkly plastic disc used for decoration.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
serge
A smooth-finished fabric in a balanced twill weave that is the same on both the face and back.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
serpentine crepe
A plain weave with lengthwise crinkled effect. Also in a ribbed form with heavy filling in the ribs.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
shading
The apparent graduations of color in cut-pile fabrics that are caused by variations in light reflection. This is not a defect, but a desirable characteristic of these fabrics.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
shantung
A plain silk weave originally made from wild silk in Shantung China on hand looms, characterized by a rough, nubbed surface caused by the slubs in the yarn.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
Shetland
Applies only to wool from a sheep raised in the Shetland Isle of Scotland. Fabrics made from this fiber are usually lightweight and warm, with a raised finish and soft hand.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
shibori
The Japanese term for a myriad of resist dyeing techniques, including Western tie-dye

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Brentano, Inc.
shuttle
The device on a loom that carries the filling yarn through the shed to interlace it with the warp.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
sisal
A hard fiber obtained from the sword like leave of the sisal plant.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
skein-dyed yarns
Spun or filament yarns of any natural or man-made fiber dyed in the form of hanks or skeins.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
spinning
The process of twisting staple fibers into single-ply yarn, or of drawing liquid through a spinneret to produce synthetic monofilaments.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
spun-silk
Yarn made of silk broken by the emergence of mature silk moths from cocoons.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC)
Standard Industrial Classification codes indicate the company’s type of business. These codes are also used in the Division of Corporation Finance as a basis for assigning review responsibility for the company’s filings.

CATEGORY : Fiber, Weave

SOURCE : US Securities and Exchange Commission
strié
Irregular streaks in a fabric of practically the same color as the background, from the French “stripe” or “streak”.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
stripe
A long, straight region of a single color.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
suedecloth
A woven fabric with a flat, napped surface finished to resemble suede.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
surah
A soft twilled fabric of silk or of a blend of silk and rayon.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
taffeta
A lustrous, medium weight, plain weave fabric with a slight ribbed appearance in the fill. It has a crisp hand, lots of body and may appear iridescent.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : fabriclink.com
tapa cloth
A fabric made in the Pacific Islands from the bark of the paper mulberry tree. Ranges in texture from fine muslin to tough and leathery; can be bleached, dyed and printed.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
tapestry
A heavy cloth woven with rich, often varicolored designs or scenes, usually hung on walls for decoration and sometimes used to cover furniture.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
tassel
A bunch of loose threads or cords bound at one end and hanging free at the other, used as an ornament on curtains or clothing, for example.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
thread
Usually a stand of yarn that has been plied, twisted and finished for smoothness, used in sewing.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
tie-dye
A method of resist dyeing in which parts of the fabric are tightly wound with yarns or tied into knots in selected areas. When the fabric is placed in a dyebath, the covered and knotted areas are protected from the dye.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Understanding Textiles (7th ed.) by Billie J. Collier, Martin J. Bide & Phyllis G. Tortora
tricot
French for warp-knitted fabric, usually flat-knitted with fine ribs on the face and ribs on the back.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
tufted fabric
Fabric decorated with short clusters of elongated strands of yarn. Made by hooked needles into fabric structures or by high-speed tufting machines.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
tweed
A coarse, rugged, often nubby woolen fabric made in any of various twill weaves and used chiefly for casual suits and coats.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
twist
The turning of fibers or yarns around their axes, expressed in number of turns per unit length.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
unfinished
Fabrics left as they come off the loom.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper Upholstered Furniture Action Council (UFAC)
The Upholstered Furniture Action Council was founded in 1978 to make upholstered furniture more resistant to ignition from smoldering cigarettes. It is an all-industry, voluntary compliance system designed to increase protection for consumers.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Upholstered Furniture Action Council
vat-dyed
Material dyed by insoluble vat colors produced on the fabric by oxidation. Considered the most resistant to the effects of washing and sunlight. Originally applied to fabrics in big wooden vats.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
v-construction
A double-weave construction for cut-pile fabrics in which the pile yarns are caught by one shot of weft.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
velours
A closely napped fabric resembling velvet, used chiefly for clothing and upholstery.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
velvet
A warp pile fabric with short-cut close pile that gives a smooth rich surface, soft to the touch. Effect is obtained by weaving two faces together and shearing apart. One type of velvet has an uncut pile. Pile may be chemically dissolved to leave patterns on a chiffon or taffeta ground. Also pile may be pressed flat, as in a panné velvet.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
venise
A point lace without net background. The design is usually embroidered ground removed later by a chemical process that leaves only the embroidery.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
viscose
A manufactured fiber made of regenerated cellulose, most commonly obtained from wood pulp. The European word for Rayon.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
voile
A light, plain weave, sheer fabric of cotton, rayon, silk or wool used especially for making dresses and curtains.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
waffle cloth
A fabric similar to pique in texture and usually made of cotton, has a honey-comb weave made on dobby loom.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
wale
In knit fabrics, a column of loops lying lengthwise in the fabric. The number of wales per inch is a measure of the fineness of the fabric.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
warp
The set of yarn in all woven fabrics that runs lengthwise and parallel to the selvage and is interwoven with the filling. The sheet of yarns wound together on a beam for the purpose of weaving or warp knitting.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
warp knits
A kind of knitting in which a number of threads are chained with one or more contiguous threads on either side. Resistant to runs and relatively easy to sew.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
warp prints
Usually a plain weave, the warp yarns are printed before the filling is inserted. The fabric has a very fuzzy design when design is distorted as fabric is woven.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
warp-faced fabric
A woven cloth in which the warp yarns predominate over the filling yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
washable
Capable of being washed without ruining or distorting the fabric.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
water-repellent fabric
Cloth that is impervious to water, but still “breathes.”

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
w-construction
A double-weave construction for cut-pile fabrics in which the pile yarns are caught and woven through a series of three weft yarns.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
wear test
A test for fabric wear, abrasion, flexibility, washing, crushing, creasing, etc., in which the fabric is made into a garment, worn for a specific time, then assessed for performance.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Vectran Fiber Website
weave
The structural pattern in which yarns are interlaced to produce a fabric. The basic weaves are plain, twill and satin.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
weaving
The process of making a cloth by interlacing the threads of the weft and the warp on a loom.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
weft
The horizontal or crosswise element in a cloth. Synonomous with fill.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
wet & dry crocking
Transfer of dye from the surface of a dyed or printed fabric onto another surface by rubbing.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : ACT Glossary
worsted
A general term applied to fabrics and yarns from combed wool and wool blends. Worsted yarn is smooth-surfaced and spun from evenly combed long staple. Worsted fabric is made from worsted yarns and is tightly woven with a smooth, hard surface. Examples are gabardine and serge.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
wrinkle recovery
The property of a fabric that enables it to recover from folding deformations.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper
Wyzenbeek Test
A test used to measure a fabric’s resistance to wear and abrasion. A fabric sample, pulled taut and weighted, is abraded with a cylinder covered with a 50 x 70 wire screen or a 10 oz. cotton duck cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990
zibeline
1. The fur of small animal in the sable family. 2. A thick, lustrous, soft fabric of wool and other animal hair, having a silky nap. Usually strong colored and sometimes striping (removal of color) is noted in the cloth.

CATEGORY : Weave

SOURCE : All-About-Fabrics.com
Please wait...

Subscribe to our newsletter

Want to be notified when our article is published? Enter your email address and name below to be the first to know.