FABRICS FAQ : textile glossary


Textile Terms begin with 'H'

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z



habutai

Smooth, soft, light, plain weave silk originally hand woven in Japan.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

hair

Natural animal fiber other than sheep's wool or silk.
CATEGORY : Fiber
SOURCE :     Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

Half-Life

The amount of time it takes half of an initial concentration of substance to degrade in the environment.
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     MBDC

hand

Touch, drape or "handle" of a fabric.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

harness

A rectangular frame on a loom that holds the heddles through which the warp yarns pass. A loom's harnesses raise and lower the heddles in predetermined patterns so that the filling yarns can be threaded through the warp sheds to produce the desired weave. Different weaves may employ anywhere from one to forty harnesses.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990

Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP)

Those pollutants that cause or may cause cancer, other serious health effects (such as reproductive effects or birth defects) or adverse environmental and ecological effects. The EPA is required to control 188 HAPs including dioxin; asbestos; toluene; metals such as cadmium, mercury, chromium and lead; benzene, which is found in gasoline; perchlorethlyene, which is emitted from some dry cleaning facilities; and methylene chloride, which is used as a solvent and paint stripper by a number of industries. Also known as toxic air pollutants.
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     ACT Glossary

hazardous material

Any material or substance, which if improperly handled or disposed of, can cause harm to the health and well-being of humans or the environment.
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     ACT Glossary

hazardous substance

Defined by the National Occupational Health and Safety Commission (NOHSC) as a substance, which has the potential, through being used at work, to harm the health or safety of persons in the workplace. (A hazardous substance is, essentially, a hazardous material, but NOHSC uses the term substance.)
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     ACT Glossary

hazardous waste

Defined by RCRA as any waste that exhibits specific hazardous characteristics such as ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity or toxicity.
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     ACT Glossary

heavy metals

Any metallic chemical element that has a relatively high density and is toxic at low concentrations. (Examples are mercury, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, thallium and lead). Semi-metallic elements (such as antimony, arsenic, selenium and tellurium) are often included in this classification.
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     ACT Glossary

heddles

The needle-like wires on a loom through which the warp yarns are drawn and which raise and lower those threads during weaving. See harness.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990

hemp

A coarse, durable fiber from the bast of a cannabis plant.
CATEGORY : Fiber
SOURCE :      Brentano, Inc.

herringbone

A fabric in which the pattern of the weave resembles the skeletal structure of the herring. Made with a broken twill weave that produces a balanced zigzag effect.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph

hide

The raw skin of an animal.
CATEGORY : Fiber
SOURCE :     Midwest Decorative Fabrics Association Textile Resources Directory, 1990

high energy dyed polyester

When a polyester fiber is heated at a high temperature it forces the molecule to open and encapsulate the dye stuff. This process enables the dye to have high color fastness and be resistant to many chemicals such as sodium hypochlorite (bleach).
CATEGORY : Fiber, Finish
SOURCE :     Brentano, Inc.

honeycomb

Weave with the surface resembling the cells of a honeycomb.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

hopsacking

An open basket weave that gets its name from the plain-weave fabric of jute or hemp used for sacking in which hops are gathered.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Introductory Textile Science (5th edition) by Marjory L. Joseph

houndstooth

A broken twill four-pointed star check.
CATEGORY : Weave
SOURCE :     Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

huarizo

Bred for its fine fleece from a llama father and alpaca mother.
CATEGORY : Fiber
SOURCE :     Textile Glossary by Marvin Klapper

Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)

A compound that consists of hydrogen, chlorine, fluorine and carbon. The HCFCs are a class of replacements for CFCs. They contain chlorine and thus deplete stratospheric ozone, but to a much lesser extent than CFCs. Production of HCFCs are currently being phased out of production.
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     ACT Glossary

Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)

A compound that consist of hydrogen, fluorine and carbon. The HFCs are a class of replacements for CFCs. Because they do not contain chlorine or bromine, they do not deplete the ozone layer.
CATEGORY : Green
SOURCE :     ACT Glossary